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The Way of the Exile

The Way of the Exile

See how the experience of Daniel and his friends in Babylonian exile offers wisdom for navigating this tension. Following Jesus in the 21st century means learning the way of the exile.

The Way of the Exile

How do we navigate this world as exiles?

One of the most difficult issues facing Christians of any culture or time is how to support, resist, or participate in the governing power structures of their day. Should followers of Jesus endorse any political movement that is or isn’t religious? What are the dangers of joining our allegiance to Jesus with loyalty to any nation or government? Religion and politics are highly-charged topics in most cultures, and many of us wonder if the Bible has any wisdom to offer as we navigate this tension.

It turns out that the Bible has immense resources for God’s people on this topic.

But it comes in the form of a narrative, not a series of direct commands. The Bible tells the story of God’s purpose to rule the world through his image-bearing creatures. The picture of humanity’s «home” is a garden-mountain-temple in Eden, where we steward God’s world and further its beauty in harmonious partnership with our Creator. And this all sounds awesome until the humans rebel and create kingdoms that elevate their own wisdom and values that demand total allegiance. In the Bible, the key image that symbolizes human autonomy and rebellion is the city of Babylon introduced in Genesis 11.

For the rest of the biblical story, the image of humanity trapped in Babylonian exile becomes a dominant theme. Abraham and his family are called out of this region to journey to the new promised land, but his later descendants end up back in Babylonian exile after a long history of rebellion. And there in Babylon, we find many books of the Bible focusing on the paradoxical situation of God’s people.

Resistance vs. Submission

Should they withdraw and cloister in a holy-huddle, or should they participate in Babylon’s culture to become God’s agents of blessing? The books of Jeremiah and Daniel offer a surprising perspective by telling us stories of Israelites who were both loyal and subversive to Babylon. They offered their best efforts to seek the well-being of Babylon, while also critiquing and resisting its idolatry of power.

Jesus calls us to respond in kind.

When we turn to the New Testament, we find Jesus adopting this same posture and mindset toward the power structures of Rome and Israel in his own day, and he taught his disciples to do the same. This is why Peter in his first letter calls followers of Jesus “foreigners and exiles,” and says that the “church is in Babylon” (1 Peter 1:1). And when he talks about how Christians should relate to the governing powers of their day, he describes a way of life that is similar to the stories of Daniel and Jesus (1 Peter 2:13-25).

Followers of Jesus offer their ultimate allegiance to their risen King, and they are to critique any kingdom that exalts its own values and power to the place of God. But at the same time, they are to seek peace and offer their best efforts to the communities in which they live. This is loyalty and subversion energized by the hope that one day King Jesus will return and replace our Babylons with his eternal Kingdom.

While the Bible doesn’t give a simple answer to this complex set of issues, it does give us a story to live by as we seek to be loyal to Jesus and his Kingdom.

The Way of the Exile

See how the experience of Daniel and his friends in Babylonian exile offers wisdom for navigating this tension. Following Jesus in the 21st century means learning the way of the exile.

The Way of the Exile

How do we navigate this world as exiles?

One of the most difficult issues facing Christians of any culture or time is how to support, resist, or participate in the governing power structures of their day. Should followers of Jesus endorse any political movement that is or isn’t religious? What are the dangers of joining our allegiance to Jesus with loyalty to any nation or government? Religion and politics are highly-charged topics in most cultures, and many of us wonder if the Bible has any wisdom to offer as we navigate this tension.

It turns out that the Bible has immense resources for God’s people on this topic.

But it comes in the form of a narrative, not a series of direct commands. The Bible tells the story of God’s purpose to rule the world through his image-bearing creatures. The picture of humanity’s «home” is a garden-mountain-temple in Eden, where we steward God’s world and further its beauty in harmonious partnership with our Creator. And this all sounds awesome until the humans rebel and create kingdoms that elevate their own wisdom and values that demand total allegiance. In the Bible, the key image that symbolizes human autonomy and rebellion is the city of Babylon introduced in Genesis 11.

For the rest of the biblical story, the image of humanity trapped in Babylonian exile becomes a dominant theme. Abraham and his family are called out of this region to journey to the new promised land, but his later descendants end up back in Babylonian exile after a long history of rebellion. And there in Babylon, we find many books of the Bible focusing on the paradoxical situation of God’s people.

Resistance vs. Submission

Should they withdraw and cloister in a holy-huddle, or should they participate in Babylon’s culture to become God’s agents of blessing? The books of Jeremiah and Daniel offer a surprising perspective by telling us stories of Israelites who were both loyal and subversive to Babylon. They offered their best efforts to seek the well-being of Babylon, while also critiquing and resisting its idolatry of power.

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Jesus calls us to respond in kind.

When we turn to the New Testament, we find Jesus adopting this same posture and mindset toward the power structures of Rome and Israel in his own day, and he taught his disciples to do the same. This is why Peter in his first letter calls followers of Jesus “foreigners and exiles,” and says that the “church is in Babylon” (1 Peter 1:1). And when he talks about how Christians should relate to the governing powers of their day, he describes a way of life that is similar to the stories of Daniel and Jesus (1 Peter 2:13-25).

Followers of Jesus offer their ultimate allegiance to their risen King, and they are to critique any kingdom that exalts its own values and power to the place of God. But at the same time, they are to seek peace and offer their best efforts to the communities in which they live. This is loyalty and subversion energized by the hope that one day King Jesus will return and replace our Babylons with his eternal Kingdom.

While the Bible doesn’t give a simple answer to this complex set of issues, it does give us a story to live by as we seek to be loyal to Jesus and his Kingdom.

Appearance and Character

Euron is pale and handsome with black hair and a dark beard. He wears a patch over his left eye, and is nicknamed Crow’s Eye. According to Euron’s nephew, Theon Greyjoy, the patch conceals a «black eye shining with malice». [7] His right eye is as blue as summer sky and is regarded as his «smiling eye». In addition, his lips are a pale blue, due to his propensity to drink shade of the evening.

Euron is a wildly unpredictable man, known for his delight in playing vicious mind games and waging psychological warfare on anyone around him. He is hated by his brothers for this reason. A skilled warrior and manipulator, Euron is cunning, shrewd, and ruthless.

Despite his dangerous and mercurial nature, Euron has little trouble in drawing men to his service, especially freaks and fools. [8] While most ironborn captains keep the lion’s share of plunder, Euron takes almost nothing for himself. [9]

The Way of the Exile

See how the experience of Daniel and his friends in Babylonian exile offers wisdom for navigating this tension. Following Jesus in the 21st century means learning the way of the exile.

The Way of the Exile

How do we navigate this world as exiles?

One of the most difficult issues facing Christians of any culture or time is how to support, resist, or participate in the governing power structures of their day. Should followers of Jesus endorse any political movement that is or isn’t religious? What are the dangers of joining our allegiance to Jesus with loyalty to any nation or government? Religion and politics are highly-charged topics in most cultures, and many of us wonder if the Bible has any wisdom to offer as we navigate this tension.

It turns out that the Bible has immense resources for God’s people on this topic.

But it comes in the form of a narrative, not a series of direct commands. The Bible tells the story of God’s purpose to rule the world through his image-bearing creatures. The picture of humanity’s «home” is a garden-mountain-temple in Eden, where we steward God’s world and further its beauty in harmonious partnership with our Creator. And this all sounds awesome until the humans rebel and create kingdoms that elevate their own wisdom and values that demand total allegiance. In the Bible, the key image that symbolizes human autonomy and rebellion is the city of Babylon introduced in Genesis 11.

For the rest of the biblical story, the image of humanity trapped in Babylonian exile becomes a dominant theme. Abraham and his family are called out of this region to journey to the new promised land, but his later descendants end up back in Babylonian exile after a long history of rebellion. And there in Babylon, we find many books of the Bible focusing on the paradoxical situation of God’s people.

Resistance vs. Submission

Should they withdraw and cloister in a holy-huddle, or should they participate in Babylon’s culture to become God’s agents of blessing? The books of Jeremiah and Daniel offer a surprising perspective by telling us stories of Israelites who were both loyal and subversive to Babylon. They offered their best efforts to seek the well-being of Babylon, while also critiquing and resisting its idolatry of power.

Jesus calls us to respond in kind.

When we turn to the New Testament, we find Jesus adopting this same posture and mindset toward the power structures of Rome and Israel in his own day, and he taught his disciples to do the same. This is why Peter in his first letter calls followers of Jesus “foreigners and exiles,” and says that the “church is in Babylon” (1 Peter 1:1). And when he talks about how Christians should relate to the governing powers of their day, he describes a way of life that is similar to the stories of Daniel and Jesus (1 Peter 2:13-25).

Followers of Jesus offer their ultimate allegiance to their risen King, and they are to critique any kingdom that exalts its own values and power to the place of God. But at the same time, they are to seek peace and offer their best efforts to the communities in which they live. This is loyalty and subversion energized by the hope that one day King Jesus will return and replace our Babylons with his eternal Kingdom.

While the Bible doesn’t give a simple answer to this complex set of issues, it does give us a story to live by as we seek to be loyal to Jesus and his Kingdom.

Recent Events

A Clash of Kings

Having returned to Pyke, Theon Greyjoy notes that his uncle Euron’s ship, Silence, is not in the fleet gathered at Lordsport. [13] [3]

A Storm of Swords

News comes to Robb Stark, King in the North, via the captain of the Myraham that Balon Greyjoy, King of the Isles and the North, fell to his death from Pyke. Euron returned to Lordsport and claimed the Seastone Chair. Lord Sawane Botley objected to his claim, however, so Euron had him drowned in a cask of seawater. [14]

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A Feast for Crows

Aeron Greyjoy is informed that his brother, Euron, returned to the Iron Islands the day after Balon’s death. [2] The timing of his return is questioned by some. [5] Euron brags to the ironborn to have reaved all over the world during his exile, including a trip to the feared ruins of Valyria. [12] According to a semi-canon source, he captured and holds hostage four warlocks of Qarth, including Pyat Pree, [15] and seizes their dragon horn. [16]

At the kingsmoot on Old Wyk called by Aeron, Euron promises to conquer all of Westeros for the ironborn using dragons, which he claims he can bind to his will with the dragon horn. Although Aeron considers Euron to be a godless man, he is elected king, besting his niece Asha, Victarion, and other contenders. [12] Euron has Lord Baelor Blacktyde killed when the man refuses to accept him as his king, taking Baelor’s sable cloak as a trophy. [11]

Euron begins raids upon the Reach, intending to sell captives into slavery in Essos. After the taking of the Shields, Euron holds a victory’s feast in Oakenshield Castle with the tied and gagged Lord Humfrey Hewett seated next to him. The Crow’s Eye forces Humfrey’s daughters and granddaughters to serve food and drink to the victorious ironborn. Euron takes Humfrey’s bastard daughter, Falia Flowers, as a bedmate and under her suggestion commands the noble born ladies to strip and serve his men naked. [11]

Euron weakens possible rivals by giving lands and titles to key followers of theirs. However, he fails to move the ironborn beyond raiding, as they are reluctant to embark on a dangerous journey in search of dragons after Lord Rodrik Harlaw points out all the hazards of such an endeavor. Euron sends Victarion and the Iron Fleet to find Daenerys Targaryen, court her in his name, and bring her and her dragons to Westeros. [11]

A Dance with Dragons

Euron styles himself King of the Isles and the North. [17] He gives Victarion the dragon horn to take with him to Meereen. Victarion again remembers that «Euron’s gifts are poisoned» when he hears the red priest Moqorro state that those who blow the horn die. [18]

The Winds of Winter

Euron has his mutes capture Aeron Damphair after the kingsmoot. He forces Aeron to drink shade of the evening, and the Damphair has visions of first Euron on a throne of skulls and later Euron as a kraken-like figure with tentacles on the Iron Throne, with a woman by his side. Euron admits to causing the deaths of Harlon, Robin, and Balon making him a kinslayer. He also admits he expects the followers to which he granted the Shield Islands to fail to hold them, thus ridding himself of potential enemies.

Prior to sailing against the Redwyne fleet and the ships of House Hightower, Aeron sees Euron clad in Valyrian steel armor. Euron has Aeron and Falia, pregnant but tongueless, bound to the prow of the Silence. Euron also orders his captains to bind the priests and septons he has kidnapped to the prows of their respective ships. [9]

The Way of the Exile

See how the experience of Daniel and his friends in Babylonian exile offers wisdom for navigating this tension. Following Jesus in the 21st century means learning the way of the exile.

The Way of the Exile

How do we navigate this world as exiles?

One of the most difficult issues facing Christians of any culture or time is how to support, resist, or participate in the governing power structures of their day. Should followers of Jesus endorse any political movement that is or isn’t religious? What are the dangers of joining our allegiance to Jesus with loyalty to any nation or government? Religion and politics are highly-charged topics in most cultures, and many of us wonder if the Bible has any wisdom to offer as we navigate this tension.

It turns out that the Bible has immense resources for God’s people on this topic.

But it comes in the form of a narrative, not a series of direct commands. The Bible tells the story of God’s purpose to rule the world through his image-bearing creatures. The picture of humanity’s «home” is a garden-mountain-temple in Eden, where we steward God’s world and further its beauty in harmonious partnership with our Creator. And this all sounds awesome until the humans rebel and create kingdoms that elevate their own wisdom and values that demand total allegiance. In the Bible, the key image that symbolizes human autonomy and rebellion is the city of Babylon introduced in Genesis 11.

For the rest of the biblical story, the image of humanity trapped in Babylonian exile becomes a dominant theme. Abraham and his family are called out of this region to journey to the new promised land, but his later descendants end up back in Babylonian exile after a long history of rebellion. And there in Babylon, we find many books of the Bible focusing on the paradoxical situation of God’s people.

Resistance vs. Submission

Should they withdraw and cloister in a holy-huddle, or should they participate in Babylon’s culture to become God’s agents of blessing? The books of Jeremiah and Daniel offer a surprising perspective by telling us stories of Israelites who were both loyal and subversive to Babylon. They offered their best efforts to seek the well-being of Babylon, while also critiquing and resisting its idolatry of power.

Jesus calls us to respond in kind.

When we turn to the New Testament, we find Jesus adopting this same posture and mindset toward the power structures of Rome and Israel in his own day, and he taught his disciples to do the same. This is why Peter in his first letter calls followers of Jesus “foreigners and exiles,” and says that the “church is in Babylon” (1 Peter 1:1). And when he talks about how Christians should relate to the governing powers of their day, he describes a way of life that is similar to the stories of Daniel and Jesus (1 Peter 2:13-25).

Followers of Jesus offer their ultimate allegiance to their risen King, and they are to critique any kingdom that exalts its own values and power to the place of God. But at the same time, they are to seek peace and offer their best efforts to the communities in which they live. This is loyalty and subversion energized by the hope that one day King Jesus will return and replace our Babylons with his eternal Kingdom.

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While the Bible doesn’t give a simple answer to this complex set of issues, it does give us a story to live by as we seek to be loyal to Jesus and his Kingdom.

Quotes about Euron

Lord Balon’s eldest brother had never given up the Old Way, even for a day. His Silence, with its black sails and dark red hull, was infamous in every port from Ibben to Asshai, it was said. [3]

He may be dead, and if he lives, why, he has spent so long at sea, he’d be half a stranger here. The ironborn would never seat a stranger in the Seastone Chair. [3]

Euron Greyjoy is no man’s notion of a king, if half of what Theon said of him was true. [14]

Tristifer: The Crow’s Eye brought back monsters from the east . aye, and wizards too.
Asha: Nuncle always had a fondness for freaks and fools. My father used to fight with him about it. Let the wizards call upon their gods. The Damphair will call on ours, and drown them. [8]

Balon was mad, Aeron is madder, and Euron is the maddest of them all. [11]

Euron’s gifts are poisoned. [11]

Tell the Crow’s Eye he’s afraid of kinslaying and he’ll murder one of his own sons just to prove you wrong. [19]

Moqorro: Others seek Daenerys too.
Tyrion: Have you seen these others in your fires?
Moqorro: Only their shadows. One most of all. A tall and twisted thing with one black eye and ten long arms, sailing on a sea of blood. [20]

Appearance and Character

Euron is pale and handsome with black hair and a dark beard. He wears a patch over his left eye, and is nicknamed Crow’s Eye. According to Euron’s nephew, Theon Greyjoy, the patch conceals a «black eye shining with malice». [7] His right eye is as blue as summer sky and is regarded as his «smiling eye». In addition, his lips are a pale blue, due to his propensity to drink shade of the evening.

Euron is a wildly unpredictable man, known for his delight in playing vicious mind games and waging psychological warfare on anyone around him. He is hated by his brothers for this reason. A skilled warrior and manipulator, Euron is cunning, shrewd, and ruthless.

Despite his dangerous and mercurial nature, Euron has little trouble in drawing men to his service, especially freaks and fools. [8] While most ironborn captains keep the lion’s share of plunder, Euron takes almost nothing for himself. [9]

The Way of the Exile

See how the experience of Daniel and his friends in Babylonian exile offers wisdom for navigating this tension. Following Jesus in the 21st century means learning the way of the exile.

The Way of the Exile

How do we navigate this world as exiles?

One of the most difficult issues facing Christians of any culture or time is how to support, resist, or participate in the governing power structures of their day. Should followers of Jesus endorse any political movement that is or isn’t religious? What are the dangers of joining our allegiance to Jesus with loyalty to any nation or government? Religion and politics are highly-charged topics in most cultures, and many of us wonder if the Bible has any wisdom to offer as we navigate this tension.

It turns out that the Bible has immense resources for God’s people on this topic.

But it comes in the form of a narrative, not a series of direct commands. The Bible tells the story of God’s purpose to rule the world through his image-bearing creatures. The picture of humanity’s «home” is a garden-mountain-temple in Eden, where we steward God’s world and further its beauty in harmonious partnership with our Creator. And this all sounds awesome until the humans rebel and create kingdoms that elevate their own wisdom and values that demand total allegiance. In the Bible, the key image that symbolizes human autonomy and rebellion is the city of Babylon introduced in Genesis 11.

For the rest of the biblical story, the image of humanity trapped in Babylonian exile becomes a dominant theme. Abraham and his family are called out of this region to journey to the new promised land, but his later descendants end up back in Babylonian exile after a long history of rebellion. And there in Babylon, we find many books of the Bible focusing on the paradoxical situation of God’s people.

Resistance vs. Submission

Should they withdraw and cloister in a holy-huddle, or should they participate in Babylon’s culture to become God’s agents of blessing? The books of Jeremiah and Daniel offer a surprising perspective by telling us stories of Israelites who were both loyal and subversive to Babylon. They offered their best efforts to seek the well-being of Babylon, while also critiquing and resisting its idolatry of power.

Jesus calls us to respond in kind.

When we turn to the New Testament, we find Jesus adopting this same posture and mindset toward the power structures of Rome and Israel in his own day, and he taught his disciples to do the same. This is why Peter in his first letter calls followers of Jesus “foreigners and exiles,” and says that the “church is in Babylon” (1 Peter 1:1). And when he talks about how Christians should relate to the governing powers of their day, he describes a way of life that is similar to the stories of Daniel and Jesus (1 Peter 2:13-25).

Followers of Jesus offer their ultimate allegiance to their risen King, and they are to critique any kingdom that exalts its own values and power to the place of God. But at the same time, they are to seek peace and offer their best efforts to the communities in which they live. This is loyalty and subversion energized by the hope that one day King Jesus will return and replace our Babylons with his eternal Kingdom.

While the Bible doesn’t give a simple answer to this complex set of issues, it does give us a story to live by as we seek to be loyal to Jesus and his Kingdom.

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