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Crytek — Game Developer

Crytek is a German video game and software developer based in Frankfurt, Germany. The company was founded by the Yerli brothers in September 1999 and later moved to Frankfurt in 2006. Crytek also operates further studios in Kiev and Istanbul. Crytek’s former studios included Crytek Black Sea in Sofia, Crytek UK in Nottingham, and Crytek USA in Austin, Texas. Crytek is best known for developing the first instalment of the Far Cry series and the Crysis series, the open world nature of their games which showcases the company’s CryEngine, and for pushing the limits on PC specs to achieve the latest in graphics and gameplay.

1999 — 2004

Crytek was founded by the German-Turkish brothers Cevat, Avni and Faruk Yerli in Coburg, Germany. One of their first game development projects was a tech demo of a game called X-Isle: Dinosaur Island, which showcased their game engine technology allowing large viewing distances that other game engines couldn’t do at that time. Crytek met with NVIDIA during the 1999 E3, the Electronic Entertainment Expo, where their tech demo caught the attention of NVIDIA and several other media groups. The company later signed up with NVIDIA to distribute X-Isle as benchmarking software for NVIDIA graphic cards.

Crytek’s first major project was a game called Engalus, an FPS (first-person shooter) with a cyberpunk theme and role-playing elements, which was first privately shown in May, 2000 at E3. The Engalus project first attracted publicity for Crytek at the 2000 ECTS with their tech demo at the NVIDIA show-booth, but it was later cancelled. The company was approached by Ubisoft to develop the title X-Isle into a full AAA game. This later evolved into Far Cry, which was released on 23rd March, 2004. Alongside this, the company announced their licensable game engine, CryEngine, that was used for the games X-Isle and Far Cry.

2004 — 2014

In February 2004, police carried out a raid on Crytek offices, acting on an ex-intern’s claim that Crytek was breaking the law by using software illegally. The German police investigated for more software copies than the licences purchased, but nothing materialised and no charges were pursued. During that same month, Crytek and EA (Electronic Arts) announced a strategic partnership in order to collaborate and develop a new gaming franchise based on the CryEngine, which would eventually become the Crysis series. Crytek chose this direction to showcase the fact that their CryEngine was not limited to just what Far Cry had shown. Because of this partnership, Ubisoft acquired the full rights to the Far Cry franchise in March 2006 as well as an everlasting licence to the first CryEngine, which they have since modified into their own Dunia Engine. In early December 2004, Crytek and ATI created a special cinematic machinima (real-time computer graphics) to demonstrate the future of PC gaming.

In 2006, Crytek announced the development of Crysis, a first person shooter — promising that it would be an original shooter with a new kind of gameplay challenge requiring Adaptive Tactics. The Crysis game later won several Best PC Game awards. In January 2007 Crytek publicly demonstrated Crytek’s CryEngine 2 and one year after that, Crysis was announced.

The Crysis game was finally released on the 13th of November 2007. In September 2008, an expansion to Crysis entitled Crysis Warhead, was released as a PC-exclusive game. It wasn’t until three years later, in October 2011, Crysis was released on some game consoles, allowing play of the original game via Xbox Live and the PlayStation Networks.

On 14 July 2008, Crytek bought Black Sea Studios and quickly renamed the studio to Crytek Black Sea. Five months later in November 2008, the Crytek company opened an office in South Korea named Crytek, Ltd. At the beginning of 2009, Crytek purchased Free Radical Design, a British video game company known for the TimeSplitters game series, and renamed the company to Crytek UK.

In March 2009, Crytek announced on their primary website that it would introduce CryEngine 3 at the 2009 GDC (Game Developers Conference). This new game engine was developed for use on the PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and Personal Computers. In October 2009, CryEngine 3 became obtainable in trade flow for game developers. In March 2010, CryEngine 3 was made compatible with stereoscopic 3D technology. Crytek then released Crysis 2, a direct sequel to the original game, on the 22nd March 2011.

At the Electronic Entertainment Expo in 2011, Crytek exhibited several new games, including the action game Ryse: Son of Rome. In September 2011, the publisher, THQ and Crytek announced a partnership to develop Homefront 2. After THQ Inc., filed for bankruptcy, Crytek acquired the Homefront franchise from THQ fully in January 2013. In February 2012, Crytek announced a new cloud-based social gaming network called Gface. The service is designed to help users meet people and play multiplayer games with friends. In 2005 Crytek began researching a cloud gaming system for Crysis, but paused development in mid 2007.

In April 2012, Crytek released the CryEngine 3.4 SDK which brought full DirectX 11 support to the CryEngine SDK. The company released Crysis 3 on the 19th February 2013 and Ryse: Son of Rome on the 22nd of November 2013 as an Xbox One launch title. The PC version of Ryse was released on the 10th of October 2014.

On 17 January 2013, Crytek officially opened an office in Turkey, Istanbul. On 28 January 2013, Crytek opened a new studio in Austin, Texas, Crytek USA, made-up primarily of former Vigil Games employees.

In July 2014, Crytek announced a strategic deal where the rights to the game Homefront including Homefront: The Revolution and the Crytek UK staff were transferred to Koch Media. The team continued its work on the game as the new Deep Silver Dambuster Studios. Crytek USA was restructured to remain a game-engine support team while development of Hunt: Horrors of the Gilded Age was transferred to Crytek.

On 20 December 2016, Crytek announced that their studios in Hungary, Bulgaria, South Korea and China would be closed down. On 7 March 2017, the company sold Crytek Black Sea to Sega and The Creative Assembly. On 28 February 2018, Crytek announced that Cevat Yerli was stepping down as the CEO of Crytek, with his brothers, Avni and Faruk Yerli, taking over the company’s leadership as joint CEOs. The development of CryEngine 4 was followed by CryEngine V.

Brave New World: How Crytek Is Using VR To Push Gaming To New Limits

Crytek is one of the most influential studios when it comes to introducing ambitious technology to video games. Since it was founded 17 years ago in 1999, it’s produced some of the most technically impressive titles in the industry, changing first-person shooters in the process.

The first Far Cry game, released in 2004, was lauded for its massive open world setting, long draw distances, seamless transitions between outdoor and indoor areas, and even an advanced rendering system for vegetation. Crytek developed its own game engine, CryEnginefor Far Cry as well. Since then, Far Cry has quickly become one of the premium shooter franchises, and CryEngine has been used in a slew of stunning titles, including Ryse: Son of Rome, and Everybody’s Gone to the Rapture.

Crytek undoubtedly has a storied history with technology, one that’s replete with accomplishments like Far Cry. It shouldn’t be a surprise, then, to see the studio embrace virtual reality.

From Far Cry To VR

“Innovation is in Crytek’s DNA and we are always investigating new technology,” said Elijah Freeman, Crytek’s Executive Producer. “VR is a medium that allows us to invent and try out new gameplay ideas, and with CryEngine we have a great foundation that gives us the freedom to experiment and translate our vision to a new platform. We have been developing VR for the last two years and one of our goals is to be one of the leading AAA VR content and technology creators.”

Like Ratchet & Clank developer Insomniac, Crytek is one of the more well known studios that’s been leading the charge on VR from the start. As much as Far Cry, Crysis, and a slew of other titles helped shape what Crytek is and means for fans, its heritage is very much rooted in exploring new technologies. The studio is convinced that VR is here to stay and isn’t just another gimmick that’ll be forgotten a few years from now

With The Climb [Review: 8/10] a rock climbing simulator, and Robinson: The Journey [Review: 7/10] — a first-person exploration game — Crytek already has a decent understanding of what works and what doesn’t work in VR. The studio’s experience making technically advanced shooters has definitely helped.

Читать еще:  Новости: Project CARS 2 выйдет во второй половине года

“The original Far Cry is now over 12 years old, and since then a great deal of work at the studio has been focused around creating technologically groundbreaking first-person games,” said Freeman. “Through that process, the team here has learned a lot about what does and doesn’t work from the player’s perspective, and that knowledge has always been poured back into CRYENGINE too – which has made it a very powerful resource for a project like Robinson.

“On top of that, Crytek has always sought to push the envelope in terms of visual fidelity, so we’ve developed a lot of techniques and tools over the years that are advantageous for VR development. Add in the fact we released Crysis 2 in stereoscopic 3D half a decade ago and I think you have a picture of a studio that was really primed for VR. It has certainly felt like a very natural step for us.”

Rock Climbing Was The Beginning

Crytek had a couple of ideas for what its first two VR games should be. Though it’s capable of delivering enjoyable and engaging gunplay, the studio also has experience making games where platforming is a major part of gameplay. In both Far Cry and Crysis, players often have to traverse mammoth environments and structures. Crytek realized that first-person platforming would work well in VR.

“Well, we experimented with a lot of different gameplay mechanics to find out what would work in VR, what would be compelling, what had potential, and so on,” said Freeman. “The climbing movement through a VR space felt very natural to everyone who tried it and as we iterated on the concept, it became clear that it deserved its own game. Free solo rock climbing is one of the most extreme, exciting, and dangerous sports on the planet. VR allows players to become present in the game world, and free solo rock climbing is the perfect kind of experience to make use of that.”

Crytek started researching rock climbing, and even had expert rock climbers play The Climb for feedback.

“You only need to take a quick look at footage of some of the world’s best free solo rock climbers to see how spectacular the sport is, as they perform death defying moves in amazingly beautiful natural environments,” said Freeman. “We’ve had both amateur and professional climbers play the game, and they’ve told us it captures an essence of the sport and a sense of realism. It’d be cool if non-climbers played the game, and were inspired to try out real life climbing after they get a taste of the sport in The Climb.”

A Love For Dinosaurs

During The Climb’s development, Crytek was coming up with an idea for a more full-fledged triple-A VR title. The studio fell in love with a particular setting — a time in history when dinosaurs roamed the earth, and humans were still relatively primitive. Crytek wanted to create a game that allowed players to visit a world they wouldn’t able to actually experience.

“When we knew that we wanted to do a VR project, we spent time thinking about some of things we would love to experience in real life, but simply can’t,” said Freeman. “Around that time, we were also working on our ‘Back to Dinosaur Island’ VR demos, and realized how magical it was to encounter prehistoric creatures in VR. We decided to explore this setting further and mix it up with something else we love – space and science fiction.”

Robinson doesn’t feature combat, as Crytek wanted to focus more on exploration and making players feel like interactive tourists. Finding and scanning exotic creatures is the crux of what you’ll be doing n Robinson. Like with Far Cry and Crysis, Crytek wants to the deliver a stunning title that can be a great primer for even more ambitious VR experiences.

“Almost everything in the game’s universe has a background, and the lore extends far beyond what players will be able to see first-hand,” said Freeman. “We feel like this approach really adds to the believability of the world, and we want players to become more immersed in the story as they explore every inch of their environment and gain an understanding of their place in this fictional universe.”

The Climb is available on the Oculus Rift using a gamepad with Touch support arriving later this year, and Robinson: The Journey is now out on PlayStation VR. Have you played either of these titles yet? If so, what did you think?

Alex Gilyadov is a freelance writer with work appearing in multiple publications, such as GameSpot, VICE, Playboy, Polygon, and more. You can follow him on Twitter: @rparampampam.

Бесплатно выпущена «Back to Dinosaur Island» от Crytek

Last week, Crytek released for free their virtual reality demo Back to Dinosaur Island . We didn’t have a good quality video at the time but now that’s no longer the case so you can head inside to see how it looks or share your own impressions if you were able to try it.

5 screens

Artwork

VR Demo

  • Annuler
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  • Annuler
  • Modifier

It’s funny how every game/movie after Jurassic Park (1993) uses the same slightly stylized interpretation of the t-rex head.

We don’t know exactly how they looked, but there are many different guesses made by scientists, yet popular culture swears to the same angry/menacing looking face.

Also, that’s some of the best playing i’ve seen in a Gamersyde video 😛

  • Annuler
  • Modifier

It’s funny how every game/movie after Jurassic Park (1993) uses the same slightly stylized interpretation of the t-rex head.

We don’t know exactly how they looked, but there are many different guesses made by scientists, yet popular culture swears to the same angry/menacing looking face.

Also, that’s some of the best playing i’ve seen in a Gamersyde video 😛

  • Annuler
  • Modifier

  • Annuler
  • Modifier

  • Annuler
  • Modifier

  • Annuler
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About Gamersyde

Gamersyde is a commercial multiplatform web portal based in Europe, with hundreds of thousands of visitors each month from all over the world. We cover both handheld and video games platforms and the site has grown into one of the biggest gaming sites in the continent. We are able to offer fast news delivery and HD content from the upcoming games, and one of the greatest and friendliest gaming communities in the world. The HD content we provide always respects the original resolution and framerate of the games we capture, making Gamersyde the one and only place to get 1080p/4K/60fps videos with high bitrate. At a time when Youtube’s subpar video compression has become the norm for most people on the Internet, we refuse to give up quality without a fight. We now also produce HDR videos, which can only be enjoyed by those who own compatible televisions. The content we produce is obviously not free of use should you want to upload our videos on your own website or YouTube channel.

Recent game releases — 2019 — 2020

Crytek recently launched Hunt: Showdown, which utilises the fifth generation of the CryEngine, and updates for the previously released free-to-play game Warface. On February 22nd 2018, Hunt: Showdown was launched on Steam as an early access title, and for Xbox Game Preview on 29 May 2019. The full release of Hunt: Showdown launched on the 27th of August 2019 for Microsoft Windows, it was also released on Xbox One on the 19th of September 2019 and PlayStation 4 on 18 February 2020.

Crytek also worked on and completed two virtual reality projects, namely The Climb for the Oculus Quest and Robinson: The Journey for the PlayStation VR console, Oculus Rift and SteamVR. Arena of Fate was cancelled after Crytek’s restructuring which saw the game’s developer Crytek Black Sea sold.

What do you think about this developer and the games they create? Leave a comment in the box below.

Brave New World: How Crytek Is Using VR To Push Gaming To New Limits

Crytek is one of the most influential studios when it comes to introducing ambitious technology to video games. Since it was founded 17 years ago in 1999, it’s produced some of the most technically impressive titles in the industry, changing first-person shooters in the process.

Читать еще:  Трейлер CGI-фильма Resident Evil с TGS

The first Far Cry game, released in 2004, was lauded for its massive open world setting, long draw distances, seamless transitions between outdoor and indoor areas, and even an advanced rendering system for vegetation. Crytek developed its own game engine, CryEnginefor Far Cry as well. Since then, Far Cry has quickly become one of the premium shooter franchises, and CryEngine has been used in a slew of stunning titles, including Ryse: Son of Rome, and Everybody’s Gone to the Rapture.

Crytek undoubtedly has a storied history with technology, one that’s replete with accomplishments like Far Cry. It shouldn’t be a surprise, then, to see the studio embrace virtual reality.

From Far Cry To VR

“Innovation is in Crytek’s DNA and we are always investigating new technology,” said Elijah Freeman, Crytek’s Executive Producer. “VR is a medium that allows us to invent and try out new gameplay ideas, and with CryEngine we have a great foundation that gives us the freedom to experiment and translate our vision to a new platform. We have been developing VR for the last two years and one of our goals is to be one of the leading AAA VR content and technology creators.”

Like Ratchet & Clank developer Insomniac, Crytek is one of the more well known studios that’s been leading the charge on VR from the start. As much as Far Cry, Crysis, and a slew of other titles helped shape what Crytek is and means for fans, its heritage is very much rooted in exploring new technologies. The studio is convinced that VR is here to stay and isn’t just another gimmick that’ll be forgotten a few years from now

With The Climb [Review: 8/10] a rock climbing simulator, and Robinson: The Journey [Review: 7/10] — a first-person exploration game — Crytek already has a decent understanding of what works and what doesn’t work in VR. The studio’s experience making technically advanced shooters has definitely helped.

“The original Far Cry is now over 12 years old, and since then a great deal of work at the studio has been focused around creating technologically groundbreaking first-person games,” said Freeman. “Through that process, the team here has learned a lot about what does and doesn’t work from the player’s perspective, and that knowledge has always been poured back into CRYENGINE too – which has made it a very powerful resource for a project like Robinson.

“On top of that, Crytek has always sought to push the envelope in terms of visual fidelity, so we’ve developed a lot of techniques and tools over the years that are advantageous for VR development. Add in the fact we released Crysis 2 in stereoscopic 3D half a decade ago and I think you have a picture of a studio that was really primed for VR. It has certainly felt like a very natural step for us.”

Rock Climbing Was The Beginning

Crytek had a couple of ideas for what its first two VR games should be. Though it’s capable of delivering enjoyable and engaging gunplay, the studio also has experience making games where platforming is a major part of gameplay. In both Far Cry and Crysis, players often have to traverse mammoth environments and structures. Crytek realized that first-person platforming would work well in VR.

“Well, we experimented with a lot of different gameplay mechanics to find out what would work in VR, what would be compelling, what had potential, and so on,” said Freeman. “The climbing movement through a VR space felt very natural to everyone who tried it and as we iterated on the concept, it became clear that it deserved its own game. Free solo rock climbing is one of the most extreme, exciting, and dangerous sports on the planet. VR allows players to become present in the game world, and free solo rock climbing is the perfect kind of experience to make use of that.”

Crytek started researching rock climbing, and even had expert rock climbers play The Climb for feedback.

“You only need to take a quick look at footage of some of the world’s best free solo rock climbers to see how spectacular the sport is, as they perform death defying moves in amazingly beautiful natural environments,” said Freeman. “We’ve had both amateur and professional climbers play the game, and they’ve told us it captures an essence of the sport and a sense of realism. It’d be cool if non-climbers played the game, and were inspired to try out real life climbing after they get a taste of the sport in The Climb.”

A Love For Dinosaurs

During The Climb’s development, Crytek was coming up with an idea for a more full-fledged triple-A VR title. The studio fell in love with a particular setting — a time in history when dinosaurs roamed the earth, and humans were still relatively primitive. Crytek wanted to create a game that allowed players to visit a world they wouldn’t able to actually experience.

“When we knew that we wanted to do a VR project, we spent time thinking about some of things we would love to experience in real life, but simply can’t,” said Freeman. “Around that time, we were also working on our ‘Back to Dinosaur Island’ VR demos, and realized how magical it was to encounter prehistoric creatures in VR. We decided to explore this setting further and mix it up with something else we love – space and science fiction.”

Robinson doesn’t feature combat, as Crytek wanted to focus more on exploration and making players feel like interactive tourists. Finding and scanning exotic creatures is the crux of what you’ll be doing n Robinson. Like with Far Cry and Crysis, Crytek wants to the deliver a stunning title that can be a great primer for even more ambitious VR experiences.

“Almost everything in the game’s universe has a background, and the lore extends far beyond what players will be able to see first-hand,” said Freeman. “We feel like this approach really adds to the believability of the world, and we want players to become more immersed in the story as they explore every inch of their environment and gain an understanding of their place in this fictional universe.”

The Climb is available on the Oculus Rift using a gamepad with Touch support arriving later this year, and Robinson: The Journey is now out on PlayStation VR. Have you played either of these titles yet? If so, what did you think?

Alex Gilyadov is a freelance writer with work appearing in multiple publications, such as GameSpot, VICE, Playboy, Polygon, and more. You can follow him on Twitter: @rparampampam.

Recent game releases — 2019 — 2020

Crytek recently launched Hunt: Showdown, which utilises the fifth generation of the CryEngine, and updates for the previously released free-to-play game Warface. On February 22nd 2018, Hunt: Showdown was launched on Steam as an early access title, and for Xbox Game Preview on 29 May 2019. The full release of Hunt: Showdown launched on the 27th of August 2019 for Microsoft Windows, it was also released on Xbox One on the 19th of September 2019 and PlayStation 4 on 18 February 2020.

Crytek also worked on and completed two virtual reality projects, namely The Climb for the Oculus Quest and Robinson: The Journey for the PlayStation VR console, Oculus Rift and SteamVR. Arena of Fate was cancelled after Crytek’s restructuring which saw the game’s developer Crytek Black Sea sold.

What do you think about this developer and the games they create? Leave a comment in the box below.

Brave New World: How Crytek Is Using VR To Push Gaming To New Limits

Crytek is one of the most influential studios when it comes to introducing ambitious technology to video games. Since it was founded 17 years ago in 1999, it’s produced some of the most technically impressive titles in the industry, changing first-person shooters in the process.

The first Far Cry game, released in 2004, was lauded for its massive open world setting, long draw distances, seamless transitions between outdoor and indoor areas, and even an advanced rendering system for vegetation. Crytek developed its own game engine, CryEnginefor Far Cry as well. Since then, Far Cry has quickly become one of the premium shooter franchises, and CryEngine has been used in a slew of stunning titles, including Ryse: Son of Rome, and Everybody’s Gone to the Rapture.

Crytek undoubtedly has a storied history with technology, one that’s replete with accomplishments like Far Cry. It shouldn’t be a surprise, then, to see the studio embrace virtual reality.

From Far Cry To VR

“Innovation is in Crytek’s DNA and we are always investigating new technology,” said Elijah Freeman, Crytek’s Executive Producer. “VR is a medium that allows us to invent and try out new gameplay ideas, and with CryEngine we have a great foundation that gives us the freedom to experiment and translate our vision to a new platform. We have been developing VR for the last two years and one of our goals is to be one of the leading AAA VR content and technology creators.”

Like Ratchet & Clank developer Insomniac, Crytek is one of the more well known studios that’s been leading the charge on VR from the start. As much as Far Cry, Crysis, and a slew of other titles helped shape what Crytek is and means for fans, its heritage is very much rooted in exploring new technologies. The studio is convinced that VR is here to stay and isn’t just another gimmick that’ll be forgotten a few years from now

With The Climb [Review: 8/10] a rock climbing simulator, and Robinson: The Journey [Review: 7/10] — a first-person exploration game — Crytek already has a decent understanding of what works and what doesn’t work in VR. The studio’s experience making technically advanced shooters has definitely helped.

Читать еще:  Сколько квестов будет в Kingdom Come: Deliverance?

“The original Far Cry is now over 12 years old, and since then a great deal of work at the studio has been focused around creating technologically groundbreaking first-person games,” said Freeman. “Through that process, the team here has learned a lot about what does and doesn’t work from the player’s perspective, and that knowledge has always been poured back into CRYENGINE too – which has made it a very powerful resource for a project like Robinson.

“On top of that, Crytek has always sought to push the envelope in terms of visual fidelity, so we’ve developed a lot of techniques and tools over the years that are advantageous for VR development. Add in the fact we released Crysis 2 in stereoscopic 3D half a decade ago and I think you have a picture of a studio that was really primed for VR. It has certainly felt like a very natural step for us.”

Rock Climbing Was The Beginning

Crytek had a couple of ideas for what its first two VR games should be. Though it’s capable of delivering enjoyable and engaging gunplay, the studio also has experience making games where platforming is a major part of gameplay. In both Far Cry and Crysis, players often have to traverse mammoth environments and structures. Crytek realized that first-person platforming would work well in VR.

“Well, we experimented with a lot of different gameplay mechanics to find out what would work in VR, what would be compelling, what had potential, and so on,” said Freeman. “The climbing movement through a VR space felt very natural to everyone who tried it and as we iterated on the concept, it became clear that it deserved its own game. Free solo rock climbing is one of the most extreme, exciting, and dangerous sports on the planet. VR allows players to become present in the game world, and free solo rock climbing is the perfect kind of experience to make use of that.”

Crytek started researching rock climbing, and even had expert rock climbers play The Climb for feedback.

“You only need to take a quick look at footage of some of the world’s best free solo rock climbers to see how spectacular the sport is, as they perform death defying moves in amazingly beautiful natural environments,” said Freeman. “We’ve had both amateur and professional climbers play the game, and they’ve told us it captures an essence of the sport and a sense of realism. It’d be cool if non-climbers played the game, and were inspired to try out real life climbing after they get a taste of the sport in The Climb.”

A Love For Dinosaurs

During The Climb’s development, Crytek was coming up with an idea for a more full-fledged triple-A VR title. The studio fell in love with a particular setting — a time in history when dinosaurs roamed the earth, and humans were still relatively primitive. Crytek wanted to create a game that allowed players to visit a world they wouldn’t able to actually experience.

“When we knew that we wanted to do a VR project, we spent time thinking about some of things we would love to experience in real life, but simply can’t,” said Freeman. “Around that time, we were also working on our ‘Back to Dinosaur Island’ VR demos, and realized how magical it was to encounter prehistoric creatures in VR. We decided to explore this setting further and mix it up with something else we love – space and science fiction.”

Robinson doesn’t feature combat, as Crytek wanted to focus more on exploration and making players feel like interactive tourists. Finding and scanning exotic creatures is the crux of what you’ll be doing n Robinson. Like with Far Cry and Crysis, Crytek wants to the deliver a stunning title that can be a great primer for even more ambitious VR experiences.

“Almost everything in the game’s universe has a background, and the lore extends far beyond what players will be able to see first-hand,” said Freeman. “We feel like this approach really adds to the believability of the world, and we want players to become more immersed in the story as they explore every inch of their environment and gain an understanding of their place in this fictional universe.”

The Climb is available on the Oculus Rift using a gamepad with Touch support arriving later this year, and Robinson: The Journey is now out on PlayStation VR. Have you played either of these titles yet? If so, what did you think?

Alex Gilyadov is a freelance writer with work appearing in multiple publications, such as GameSpot, VICE, Playboy, Polygon, and more. You can follow him on Twitter: @rparampampam.

Бесплатно выпущена «Back to Dinosaur Island» от Crytek

Last week, Crytek released for free their virtual reality demo Back to Dinosaur Island . We didn’t have a good quality video at the time but now that’s no longer the case so you can head inside to see how it looks or share your own impressions if you were able to try it.

5 screens

Artwork

VR Demo

  • Annuler
  • Modifier

  • Annuler
  • Modifier

It’s funny how every game/movie after Jurassic Park (1993) uses the same slightly stylized interpretation of the t-rex head.

We don’t know exactly how they looked, but there are many different guesses made by scientists, yet popular culture swears to the same angry/menacing looking face.

Also, that’s some of the best playing i’ve seen in a Gamersyde video 😛

  • Annuler
  • Modifier

It’s funny how every game/movie after Jurassic Park (1993) uses the same slightly stylized interpretation of the t-rex head.

We don’t know exactly how they looked, but there are many different guesses made by scientists, yet popular culture swears to the same angry/menacing looking face.

Also, that’s some of the best playing i’ve seen in a Gamersyde video 😛

  • Annuler
  • Modifier

  • Annuler
  • Modifier

  • Annuler
  • Modifier

  • Annuler
  • Modifier

$198 of $400 per month

Hyrule Warriors: Age of Calamity

Sniper Ghost Warrior Contracts 2

Empire of Sin

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Melmoth @docLEXfisti: [url] (1 Week ago)

docLEXfisti but damn, when switching on 4K it sure stutters a lot. mediocre port (1 Week ago)

docLEXfisti Observer System Redux reminds me a bit of Snatcher (1 Week ago)

docLEXfisti it came at 4pm. but damn, was it worth it (1 Week ago)

nostradamus @docLEXfisti: [url] (1 Week ago)

docLEXfisti damn ,where’s DHL with my Series X. that lauch-day thrill (1 Week ago)

catfish Yeah, other than the Ascent, nothing MS has shown yet for XSX has impressed me much visually. I have gamepass on PC, but little to interest me at the moment. (2 Weeks ago)

Driftwood GSY is getting some nice content at 3 pm CEST with our July podcast and some videos of the Deus Ex Mankind Divided preview build. 🙂 (> 3 Months ago)

Driftwood For once we’ll be live at 4:30 pm CEST. Blim should not even be tired! (> 3 Months ago)

Driftwood More Quantum Break coverage coming in a few hours, 9:00 a.m CEST. (> 3 Months ago)

Driftwood We’ll have a full review up for Firewatch at 7 pm CET. Videos will only be tomorrow though. (> 3 Months ago)

Driftwood Tonight’s livestream will be at 9:15 GMT+1, not GMT+2 as first stated. (> 3 Months ago)

Driftwood New GSY Live dedicated this time to Just Cause 3 on Tuesday 9:30 GMT+2 (> 3 Months ago)

Driftwood Join us tomorrow at 10 pm GMT+2 for a new livestream. We’ll be playing Rise of the Tomb Raider. (> 3 Months ago)

Godfall finally on Gamersyde and in HDR

    Tuesday, November 17, 2020 Driftwood

No Man’s Sky update on Xbox Series X

    Tuesday, November 17, 2020 davton

Xbox Series X 4K video of WRC 9

    Tuesday, November 17, 2020 davton

About Gamersyde

Gamersyde is a commercial multiplatform web portal based in Europe, with hundreds of thousands of visitors each month from all over the world. We cover both handheld and video games platforms and the site has grown into one of the biggest gaming sites in the continent. We are able to offer fast news delivery and HD content from the upcoming games, and one of the greatest and friendliest gaming communities in the world. The HD content we provide always respects the original resolution and framerate of the games we capture, making Gamersyde the one and only place to get 1080p/4K/60fps videos with high bitrate. At a time when Youtube’s subpar video compression has become the norm for most people on the Internet, we refuse to give up quality without a fight. We now also produce HDR videos, which can only be enjoyed by those who own compatible televisions. The content we produce is obviously not free of use should you want to upload our videos on your own website or YouTube channel.

Recent game releases — 2019 — 2020

Crytek recently launched Hunt: Showdown, which utilises the fifth generation of the CryEngine, and updates for the previously released free-to-play game Warface. On February 22nd 2018, Hunt: Showdown was launched on Steam as an early access title, and for Xbox Game Preview on 29 May 2019. The full release of Hunt: Showdown launched on the 27th of August 2019 for Microsoft Windows, it was also released on Xbox One on the 19th of September 2019 and PlayStation 4 on 18 February 2020.

Crytek also worked on and completed two virtual reality projects, namely The Climb for the Oculus Quest and Robinson: The Journey for the PlayStation VR console, Oculus Rift and SteamVR. Arena of Fate was cancelled after Crytek’s restructuring which saw the game’s developer Crytek Black Sea sold.

What do you think about this developer and the games they create? Leave a comment in the box below.

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